Living Center Oregon

Sustainable Living Center Oregon

Free Pea Heirloom Seeds

Free 7 Heirloom Pea Seeds

Sustainable Living Center of Lincoln City takes threats to biodiversity seriously. We are starting to build a Tsunami Seed Bank of select varieties that will grow on the Oregon Coast, so we can feed ourselves before and after, if we ever get hit by a Tsunami.

We offer free seeds to people who promise they will grow, document and harvest the seeds from one plant and returned the seeds from that plant back to the Center.

Presently, there is 8 different varieties in our Pea Seed Bank. If you have a pea that is not on our list, we accept donations.

Dwarf Gray Sugar Pea is a heirloom pea doesn’t require staking or trellises

  • lovage-herb-organicStringless, 3-4 inch pods
  • Beautiful bi-color blossoms
  • Vines grow to 24-30 inches and don’t require trellises
  • Edible podded pea

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States. The wild ancestors of peas grew in the Mediterranean basin and over thousands of years were selected for their dry seeds. By the 3rd century BCE peas were being grown by the ancient Greeks and in the Middle Ages field peas kept the population fed in years of near famine.

Fresh, or garden, peas first started to be consumed in the 17th century and split peas developed late in the 19th century.

Peas can be eaten fresh and tossed with mixed greens or added to stir-fries.

Try roasting your peas and dipping the pods in a peanut-sesame dipping sauce. You can also roast them with potatoes and carrots and toss with olive oil, garlic, and herbs.

Fresh peas are an excellent addition to pasta in cream sauce with asparagus and mushrooms. Peas pair well with mint, feta or goat cheese, toasted nuts, and parmesan.

Peas can be eaten fresh and tossed with mixed greens or added to stir-fries.

Try roasting your peas and dipping the pods in a peanut-sesame dipping sauce. You can also roast them with potatoes and carrots and toss with olive oil, garlic, and herbs.

Fresh peas are an excellent addition to pasta in cream sauce with asparagus and mushrooms. Peas pair well with mint, feta or goat cheese, toasted nuts, and parmesan.

Blue Podded Shelling with a beautiful blue pods contain the perfect peas for soup

  • Pods are blushed with blue-purple
  • Vines grow to 5-6 feet and ornamental
  • Soup pea

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.  This variety is a productive Dutch strain of pea and also known as ‘Blauwschokkers.’

The wild ancestors of peas grew in the Mediterranean basin and over thousands of years were selected for their dry seeds. By the 3rd century BCE peas were being grown by the ancient Greeks and in the Middle Ages field peas kept the population fed in years of near famine.

Fresh, or garden, peas first started to be consumed in the 17th century and split peas developed late in the 19th century.

Soup peas have been enjoyed as a winter staple in Europe for centuries. Soak dry seeds overnight before cooking the peas.

Split pea soup with ham is a warm and rich dish, but it isn’t the only soup that features peas. Try using peas with your favorite curries or puree cooked peas and roasted cauliflower for a creamy soup.

Fresh peas can be used in spring soups with watercress, mint, asparagus, or parsley.

Asparagus Pea is a unique variety of pea that grows low to the ground

  • asparagus-peaRed flowers
  • Vines grow laterally along the ground
  • Thrives in poor soil
  • Edible podded pea

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.  The Asparagus pea is also known as ‘Winged Pea’ and is a legume that is not related to either asparagus or peas. It most likely was originally domesticated in northwest Africa. It is mentioned as early as 1734 by the celebrated gardener and botanist Philip Miller.

The wild ancestors of peas grew in the Mediterranean basin and over thousands of years were selected for their dry seeds. By the 3rd century BCE peas were being grown by the ancient Greeks and in the Middle Ages field peas kept the population fed in years of near famine.

Fresh, or garden, peas first started to be consumed in the 17th century and split peas developed late in the 19th century.

Green Arrow is a organic variety with a extremely productive shelling pea

  • green-arrow-peaPods sometimes borne in doubles with 8-11 peas each
  • Vines grow to 28 inches
  • Shelling pea

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.This variety is an English main crop for home and market growers and is sometimes known as ‘Green Shaft’ pea.

The wild ancestors of peas grew in the Mediterranean basin and over thousands of years were selected for their dry seeds. By the 3rd century BCE peas were being grown by the ancient Greeks and in the Middle Ages field peas kept the population fed in years of near famine.

Fresh, or garden, peas first started to be consumed in the 17th century and split peas developed late in the 19th century.

This Amish Snap Pea is very productive and super sweet.

  • amish-snap-pea-organicOrganic
  • Sweet and crisp flavor
  • Vines grow to 5-6 feet, pods grow to 2 inches
  • Snap pea

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.  The wild ancestors of peas grew in the Mediterranean basin and over thousands of years were selected for their dry seeds. By the 3rd century BCE peas were being grown by the ancient Greeks and in the Middle Ages field peas kept the population fed in years of near famine.

Fresh, or garden, peas first started to be consumed in the 17th century and split peas developed late in the 19th century.

Golden Sweet is an Indian variety of pea with bright yellow pods.

  • golden-sweet-pea-organicLemon yellow pods
  • Vines grow to 6 feet
  • Bi-colored purple flowers
  • Edible podded pea

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.  The wild ancestors of peas grew in the Mediterranean basin and over thousands of years were selected for their dry seeds. By the 3rd century BCE peas were being grown by the ancient Greeks and in the Middle Ages field peas kept the population fed in years of near famine.

Fresh, or garden, peas first started to be consumed in the 17th century and split peas developed late in the 19th century.

Champion of England is a heirloom “tall pea” grows to heights of 10 feet

  • champion-of-england-peaVines grow to 10 feet
  • Each pod has 8-10 seeds
  • Shelling pea

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States. This historic variety has a history back to the 1840s. It is an heirloom from the family of Robert Woodbridge and donated to Seed Savers Exchange by Ben Bagel and Kate McEvoy. Woodbridge’s grandmother got the seed “from the head gardener at a big country house during the war” and grew it in her garden in the village of Pickworth, Lincolnshire, England.

The wild ancestors of peas grew in the Mediterranean basin and over thousands of years were selected for their dry seeds. By the 3rd century BCE peas were being grown by the ancient Greeks and in the Middle Ages field peas kept the population fed in years of near famine.

Fresh, or garden, peas first started to be consumed in the 17th century and split peas developed late in the 19th century.

 

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This entry was posted on July 6, 2016 by .