Living Center Oregon

Sustainable Living Center Oregon

Solar Eclipe

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Depoe Bay will experience a total solar eclipse when the moon moves right in front of the sun, covering it completely for a very short time. It darkens the whole sky, lets you look right at the sun*, and shows you the beautiful corona that surrounds the sun. Stars come out, the horizon glows with a 360-degree sunset, the temperature drops, and day turns into night. Oregon is on the center line and several cities around the state will experience maximum totality.

On the beach in Oregon, just north of Newport, the shadow will first touch land at about 10:15am, and will experience a full minute and fifty seconds of totality. The actual centerline of the eclipse path will hit solid ground six seconds later, and plunge Lincoln Beach and Depoe Bay into darkness for one minute and 58 seconds! The first total solar eclipse touching the continental United States since 1979 touches down on the Oregon coast between Lincoln City and Newport at 10:15 a.m. PDT. Before Oregon, the shadow of the Moon (umbra) does not touch any other landmass or island before Oregon.

The Great American Eclipse

“The National Eclipse, the worlds greatest natural phenomenon will be the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in America since 1918. Entering Oregon and exiting in South Carolina, most of the Continental United States will be able to partially see the 2017 eclipse. However, to fully experience total darkness you must be within a 70 mile band of the shadow.

The difference between seeing the eclipse from within this band and outside of it is truly “Night & Day”

Oregon will be one of the most popular states to view the eclipse. While the rest of the United States offers a longer duration of totality, sections of the eclipse path in Oregon offers the best weather prospects anywhere along the entire eclipse path.

Two major viewing parties are being organized in Oregon. The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) has announced a viewing event at the state fairgrounds in Salem, see www.omsi.edu/eclipse-2017 for details. Another event, the Oregon SOLARFEST is being held in Madras, Oregon. See www.oregonsolarfest.com for information.

The Sustainable Living Center is the Oregon coast half way between Lincoln City and Newport Solar Eclipse Area. It is a perfect location to see the eclipse. Come and join us.

partical eclipse

Looking directly at the Sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the Moon entirely blocks the Sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality.

glassesThe only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or handheld solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the Sun. To date four manufacturers have certified that their eclipse glasses and handheld solar viewers meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard for such products: Rainbow Symphony, American Paper Optics, Thousand Oaks Optical, and TSE 17.

Instructions for safe use of solar filters/viewers:

Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter. Always supervise children using solar filters.

Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright Sun. After glancing at the Sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the Sun.

Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed Sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device. Similarly, do not look at the Sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or handheld solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury.

Since we are within the path of totality, remove your solar filter only when the Moon completely covers the Sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright Sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to glance at the remaining partial phases.

An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially eclipsed Sun is pinhole projection. For example, cross the outstretched, slightly open fingers of one hand over the outstretched, slightly open fingers of the other. With your back to the Sun, look at your hands’ shadow on the ground. The little spaces between your fingers will project a grid of small images on the ground, showing the Sun as a crescent during the partial phases of the eclipse.

Remember the Solar Eclipse

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This entry was posted on March 30, 2017 by .