Living Center Oregon

Sustainable Living Center Oregon

35 Lettuce Heirloom Varieties – Free Seeds

1_lettuceSustainable Living Center of Lincoln City takes threats to biodiversity seriously. We are starting to build a Tsunami Seed Bank of select varieties that will grow on the Oregon Coast, so we can feed ourselves before and after, if we ever get hit by a Tsunami.

We offer free seeds to people who promise they will grow, document and harvest the seeds from one plant and returned the seeds from that plant back to the Center.

Presently, there is 35 different varieties in our Lettuce Bank. If you have a lettuce that is not on our list, we accept donations.

A person does even not need a yard to grow lettuce.  It can be done with a Kratky Tub©

Details are at: http://www.KratkyTub.com

HARVESTING

Harvesting lettuce is relatively simple: Leaf lettuce can be cut as soon as it is large enough to use, usually in 50 to 60 days from planting. Cutting every other plant at the ground will give remaining plants more space for growth. 

Romaine and Butterhead lettuce can be harvested in about 60 to 70 days from planting. Crisphead varieties take longer and should be harvested as soon as a head develops but before outer leaves turn brown. If seed stalks appear, pick the lettuce immediately and store in the refrigerator to prevent bitterness.

To store lettuce first wash it well by immersing in water and swishing it around. Place it in a colander and rinse then drip dry. When it is dry place it in a plastic bag in the refrigerator or wrap in paper towels and place in a bowl in the refrigerator. It keeps best at 32 degrees with 96% humidity. Avoid storing lettuce with apples, pears or bananas as they release a natural ripening agent that will cause brown spots and the leaves will decay quickly.

SAVING SEEDS

HARVEST: Some outside leaves can be harvested for eating without harming seed production. Allow seed heads to dry 2-3 weeks after flowering. Individual heads will ripen at different times making the harvest of large amounts of seed at one time nearly impossible. Wait until half the flowers on each plant has gone to seed. Cut entire top of plant and allow to dry upside down in an open paper bag.

PROCESS: Rubbing separates the plumes and chaff from the seeds. When completely dry, shake the flower stems in the bag. Rub the seed heads between your hands to release more seeds. Put the seed through a fine mesh sieve that allows the seeds through but retains the chaff and plumes; this will give relatively clean seed. Winnowing is difficult because seeds and chaff are about the same size and weight.

For extra cleaning use reverse screening, with a smaller mesh that retains the seed but lets small pieces or chaff and plume through. The dust produced during cleaning causes irritation to the lungs and eyes. If cleaning large amounts use a mask and goggles or clean outdoors.

The Center conserve and promote America’s culturally diverse, endangered garden seeds, and food crop heritage for future generations by collecting, growing, and sharing seeds and plants.

Below is our present Lettuce Bank

Red Romaine – The largest romaine lettuce

  • red-romaine-lettuce-organicOrganic
  • Red color develops in cool weather
  • Heads grow to 12 inches tall by 10-12 inches’ wide
  • 70 days

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.  It may be that the ancient Egyptians were the first to cultivate lettuce from a weed, valuable for its oil producing seeds, to a food crop grown for its leaves. The Greeks and Romans adopted the vegetable and it spread to Europe. By the 18th century many varieties of lettuce had been developed that still exist today.  This lettuce can be used in salads or as an addition to sandwiches and burgers. Mix it with other varieties to create a salad mix of different textures, colors, and flavors.

Salads that have a lettuce base are often combined with grated cheese, fresh or dried fruit, nuts, and rich and crispy meats like bacon or pork belly.  Plant in full sun or partial shade.

Slobolt Lettuce

True to its name, this heirloom lettuce will grow all summer.

  • solbolt-lettuceThick clusters of green, frilled leaves
  • Good flavor, never bitter
  • Slow to bolt
  • Loose-leaf and cut-and-come again
  • 45 – 55 days

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States. This lettuce has been a garden standard since it was introduced in 1946.

It may be that the ancient Egyptians were the first to cultivate lettuce from a weed, valuable for its oil producing seeds, to a food crop grown for its leaves. The Greeks and Romans adopted the vegetable and it spread to Europe. By the 18th century many varieties of lettuce had been developed that still exist today.  This lettuce can be used in salads or as an addition to sandwiches and burgers. Mix it with other varieties to create a salad mix of different textures, colors, and flavors.

Salads that have a lettuce base are often combined with grated cheese, fresh or dried fruit, nuts, and rich and crispy meats like bacon or pork belly.  Best grown in cooler weather.  Plant in full sun or partial shade.

Pablo Lettuce

pablo-lettuceA loose crisp head lettuce with a mild flavor and good texture.

  • Flat leaves with wavy edges
  • Slow to bolt
  • Good texture and flavor
  • Loose Crisp head or Iceberg lettuce
  • 60 – 80 days

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.  It may be that the ancient Egyptians were the first to cultivate lettuce from a weed, valuable for its oil producing seeds, to a food crop grown for its leaves. The Greeks and Romans adopted the vegetable and it spread to Europe. By the 18th century many varieties of lettuce had been developed that still exist today. This lettuce can be used in salads or as an addition to sandwiches and burgers. Mix it with other varieties to create a salad mix of different textures, colors, and flavors.

Salads that have a lettuce base are often combined with grated cheese, fresh or dried fruit, nuts, and rich and crispy meats like bacon or pork belly. Plant in full sun or partial shade.

Red Malabar Spinach

red-malabar-spinachA beautiful ornamental spinach that climbs trellises and loves hot weather.

  • Soft, rounded leaves
  • Red leaf veins and stems
  • Re-grows rapidly
  • Heat tolerant
  • 50-70 days, Likes 70-80 Degree

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.  Red Malabar is not a true spinach, but a heat loving vine from India with similar flavor and usage.

When Catherine de ‘Medici became queen of France she brought her love of spinach. Any French dish that incorporated spinach was thereafter known as “Florentine” as a credit to de ‘Medici’s heritage. Spinach is an excellent source of vitamins and minerals and to get the best benefit from it, eat the spinach leaves raw or just slightly cooked.

You can use spinach as the leaves in a salad paired with berries, nuts, bacon, or fresh cheeses. You can also combine cooked spinach with curries or Middle Eastern spices and cream sauces.  Plant in full sun or partial shade.

Mizuna Asian Greens

mizuna-asian-greens-organicThis Japanese green is delicious in salads.

  • Organic
  • Green, lacy-edged leaves
  • Narrow white stems
  • Spicy flavor
  • 21 – 40 days Plant in full sun or partial shade.

 

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.  Mizuna has been grown in Japan and China for centuries but has only become popular in the United States in the last few decades.

It is related to turnips, Napa cabbage, and other members of the Brassica rapa family. Mizuna is a wonderful addition to salad mixes where it’s mildly peppery flavor can replace arugula. The leaves are crisp and fringed.

The Japanese are known to pickle the leaves, but we recommend adding them to Asian soups or stir-fries.

Buttercrunch Lettuce

 

BUTTERCRUNCH-2Buttercrunch is an improved Bibb type lettuce with larger heads and better bolt resistance. Tender, crispy, and tasty with exceptional heat tolerance.

1963 All American Selections winner.

Average: 65 days

Direct seed or transplant in early spring, as soon as you can work the soil. To get an early start, prepare beds the previous fall by working in manure or compost and raking smooth to leave a fine seedbed.

Direct-seeding: Sow seed 1/8 inch deep, 1 inch apart in rows 12 to 18 inches apart. When plants have two or three true leaves, thin to 12-inch spacings for crisphead varieties, 6 to 10 inches for other types. You can also lightly broadcast seed (particularly of looseleaf varieties) in a patch instead of a row.

Transplants: Sow in 1-inch cells 3 to 4 weeks before transplanting outside. Harden seedlings by reducing water and temperature for 3 days before transplanting. Hardened plants should survive 20 F. Space crisphead transplants 12 inches apart in rows 18 inches apart. Space other varieties 6 to 10 inches apart in rows 12 to 18 inches apart.

Seeds need light to germinate, so do not plant too deep.

Make succession plantings every week or two. Grow several varieties with different maturity dates for a continuous supply.

Lettuce has a shallow root system. Keep soil moist to keep plants growing continuously. Mulch to retain moisture and suppress weeds (unless slugs are a problem).

Moisture stress and high temperatures, particularly at night, encourage bolting. As the season progresses, plant more bolt-resistant varieties. Locate plants where they will be partially shaded by taller nearby plants, latticework or other screen.

Use row covers to protect very early plantings from cold, to protect young plants from insects, and (supported by hoops) to shade crops when warm weather arrives.

For fall crops, time maturity around time of first expected frost. Mature plants aren’t as tolerant of freezing as seedlings.

 

 

Grand Rapids Lettuce

  • Grand-Rapids-LettuceUSDA Zone Range: 4-9
  • pH level: 6.2-6.8
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Seed spacing: 1/2-1″
  • Planting depth: 1/8″
  • Row spacing: 12-18″
  • Germination time: 11 days
  • Maturity range: 43-46 days
  • Average height: 5-12″

Large green leaves of this lettuce variety are wavy and curled at the edges, and resistant to tip burn. Crisp and tasty, this is a super addition to your salad. Can be grown in cold frames or green houses as well as in the garden.

Iceberg Head Lettuce

  • ICEBERG-2TUSDA Zone Range: 4-9
  • pH level: 6-7.5
  • Exposure: Partial sun
  • Seed spacing: 10-12″
  • Planting depth: 1/4″-1/2″
  • Row spacing: 14″
  • Germination time: 2-14 days
  • Maturity range: 62-80 days
  • Average height: 10-12″

Large compact head with mild flavor superior to the supermarket variety. Heart is tender, almost white with light green outer leaves. 1894 American heirloom. Average: 75 days

Direct seed or transplant in early spring, as soon as you can work the soil. To get an early start, prepare beds the previous fall by working in manure or compost and raking smooth to leave a fine seedbed.

Direct-seeding: Sow seed 1/8 inch deep, 1 inch apart in rows 12 to 18 inches apart. When plants have two or three true leaves, thin to 12-inch spacings for crisphead varieties, 6 to 10 inches for other types. You can also lightly broadcast seed (particularly of looseleaf varieties) in a patch instead of a row.

Transplants: Sow in 1-inch cells 3 to 4 weeks before transplanting outside. Harden seedlings by reducing water and temperature for 3 days before transplanting. Hardened plants should survive 20 F. Space crisphead transplants 12 inches apart in rows 18 inches apart. Space other varieties 6 to 10 inches apart in rows 12 to 18 inches apart.

Seeds need light to germinate, so do not plant too deep.

Make succession plantings every week or two. Grow several varieties with different maturity dates for a continuous supply.

Lettuce has a shallow root system. Keep soil moist to keep plants growing continuously. Mulch to retain moisture and suppress weeds (unless slugs are a problem).

Moisture stress and high temperatures, particularly at night, encourage bolting. As the season progresses, plant more bolt-resistant varieties. Locate plants where they will be partially shaded by taller nearby plants, latticework or other screen.

Use row covers to protect very early plantings from cold, to protect young plants from insects, and (supported by hoops) to shade crops when warm weather arrives.

For fall crops, time maturity around time of first expected frost. Mature plants aren’t as tolerant of freezing as seedlings.

 

 

Rouge D’Hiver French Romaine Lettuce

  • ROUGE-2TUSDA Zone Range: 2-9
  • pH level: 6-6.8
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Seed spacing: Thin to 12″
  • Planting depth: 1/8″
  • Row spacing: 8-10″
  • Germination time: 7-14 days
  • Maturity range: 55-65 days
  • Average height: 6-12″

It’s name means “Red of Winter”, and this French heirloom lettuce does indeed thrive in cool conditions. The leaves are dark red to bronze on the tips, with a dark green base. Commonly used as a baby leaf variety, but also forms an amazing full size head. Sweet buttery texture, and quick growing.

Baby leaf ready in 28 days, 55 days to mature.

Direct seed or transplant in early spring, as soon as you can work the soil. To get an early start, prepare beds the previous fall by working in manure or compost and raking smooth to leave a fine seedbed.

Direct-seeding: Sow seed 1/8 inch deep, 1 inch apart in rows 12 to 18 inches apart. When plants have two or three true leaves, thin to 12-inch spacings for crisphead varieties, 6 to 10 inches for other types. You can also lightly broadcast seed (particularly of looseleaf varieties) in a patch instead of a row.

Transplants: Sow in 1-inch cells 3 to 4 weeks before transplanting outside. Harden seedlings by reducing water and temperature for 3 days before transplanting. Hardened plants should survive 20 F. Space crisphead transplants 12 inches apart in rows 18 inches apart. Space other varieties 6 to 10 inches apart in rows 12 to 18 inches apart.

Seeds need light to germinate, so do not plant too deep.

Make succession plantings every week or two. Grow several varieties with different maturity dates for a continuous supply.

Lettuce has a shallow root system. Keep soil moist to keep plants growing continuously. Mulch to retain moisture and suppress weeds (unless slugs are a problem).

Moisture stress and high temperatures, particularly at night, encourage bolting. As the season progresses, plant more bolt-resistant varieties. Locate plants where they will be partially shaded by taller nearby plants, latticework or other screen.

Use row covers to protect very early plantings from cold, to protect young plants from insects, and (supported by hoops) to shade crops when warm weather arrives.

For fall crops, time maturity around time of first expected frost. Mature plants aren’t as tolerant of freezing as seedlings.

 

 

Black Seeded Simpson Leaf Lettuce

  • SIMPSON-2TUSDA Zone Range: 4-9
  • pH level: 6.2-6.8
  • Exposure: Full sun
  • Seed spacing: 10-12″
  • Planting depth: 1/4″-1/2″
  • Row spacing: 14″
  • Germination time: 2-14 days
  • Maturity range: 50 days
  • Average height: 6-12″

Black Seeded Simpson has been a popular home garden variety for generations. It is an early producer that has adapted and tolerant to heat, drought and frost!

This heirloom dates back to 1850!

Direct seed or transplant in early spring, as soon as you can work the soil. To get an early start, prepare beds the previous fall by working in manure or compost and raking smooth to leave a fine seedbed.

Direct-seeding: Sow seed 1/8 inch deep, 1 inch apart in rows 12 to 18 inches apart. When plants have two or three true leaves, thin to 12-inch spacings for crisphead varieties, 6 to 10 inches for other types. You can also lightly broadcast seed (particularly of looseleaf varieties) in a patch instead of a row.

Transplants: Sow in 1-inch cells 3 to 4 weeks before transplanting outside. Harden seedlings by reducing water and temperature for 3 days before transplanting. Hardened plants should survive 20 F. Space crisphead transplants 12 inches apart in rows 18 inches apart. Space other varieties 6 to 10 inches apart in rows 12 to 18 inches apart.

Seeds need light to germinate, so do not plant too deep.

Make succession plantings every week or two. Grow several varieties with different maturity dates for a continuous supply.

Lettuce has a shallow root system. Keep soil moist to keep plants growing continuously. Mulch to retain moisture and suppress weeds (unless slugs are a problem).

Moisture stress and high temperatures, particularly at night, encourage bolting. As the season progresses, plant more bolt-resistant varieties. Locate plants where they will be partially shaded by taller nearby plants, latticework or other screen.

Use row covers to protect very early plantings from cold, to protect young plants from insects, and (supported by hoops) to shade crops when warm weather arrives.

For fall crops, time maturity around time of first expected frost. Mature plants aren’t as tolerant of freezing as seedlings.

 

 

Red Iceberg Lettuce

red-iceberg-lettuceThis deep red iceberg lettuce is rarely offered.

  • Heads grow to 16 inches
  • Holds well in heat
  • Crisphead or Iceberg lettuce
  • 50 days to harvest

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.

It may be that the ancient Egyptians were the first to cultivate lettuce from a weed, valuable for its oil producing seeds, to a food crop grown for its leaves. The Greeks and Romans adopted the vegetable and it spread to Europe. By the 18th century many varieties of lettuce had been developed that still exist today.

This lettuce can be used in salads or as an addition to sandwiches and burgers. Mix it with other varieties to create a salad mix of different textures, colors, and flavors.

Salads that have a lettuce base are often combined with grated cheese, fresh or dried fruit, nuts, and rich and crispy meats like bacon or pork belly.

Reine Des Glases Lettuce

reine-des-glaces-lettuceA slow-bolting variety that is ideal for summer plantings.

  • Dark green, lacy leaves
  • Slow to bolt
  • Use as leaf lettuce after heads harvested
  • Crisphead lettuce

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.

This variety is also known as “Ice Queen) lettuce.

It may be that the ancient Egyptians were the first to cultivate lettuce from a weed, valuable for its oil producing seeds, to a food crop grown for its leaves. The Greeks and Romans adopted the vegetable and it spread to Europe. By the 18th century many varieties of lettuce had been developed that still exist today.

This lettuce can be used in salads or as an addition to sandwiches and burgers. Mix it with other varieties to create a salad mix of different textures, colors, and flavors.

Salads that have a lettuce base are often combined with grated cheese, fresh or dried fruit, nuts, and rich and crispy meats like bacon or pork belly.

Arugula

  • arugula-arugula-organicOrganic
  • Nutty flavor
  • Fast-growing

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.

Arugula, also known as Rocket, has been used as an edible herb or salad green since the age of the Romans. It was traditionally collected in the wild and added to salads along with other herbs like parsley.

The nutty and peppery taste of arugula is strong for a leafy green and provides a nice contrast to lettuce in a salad.

Larger and older leaves should be warmed and even lightly wilted for the best flavor. You can sprinkle them on pizzas fresh from the oven or toss them with pasta and roasted tomatoes.

Try replacing basil with arugula in your favorite pesto recipe!

Lolla Rossa Lettuce

lollo-rossa-darkness-lettuce (1)Vegetable Days to Maturity: 50

Height: 6″ to 12″

Vegetable Spacing: 1″ to 2″

Rows should be spaced at 12″-18″ apart.

Try this beautiful and delicious heirloom lettuce for a tart and colorful addition to your salad. This Romaine type lettuce has a bronze-red head with a green heart.

The best color and flavor develop during cooler weather. One of the slowest to bolt, tolerates heat and is also cold hardy. Red Lollo Rossa lettuce is a classic Italian lettuce, with dark copper red fading to bright green, finely crinkled frilly leaves which are crisp, almost brittle when snapped.  This lettuce is appreciated for its unique shape and refreshing taste. It holds well in summer heat and in the cold. Harvest outer leaves or the entire plant.

Lollo Rossa, also known as Lollo Rosso, for which you pay premium prices for in the supermarket is one of the easiest, trouble free lettuces you can grow. It’s a cut-and-come-again, that is, if you pick the outer leaves, the plant will continue to grow. Given the right conditions, this type of lettuce will produce leaves for three months or more.

Merveille de Four Seasons Lettuce

marveille_lettuce_MOrganic Merveille de Four Seasons Lettuce Seed is an old French heirloom lettuce that was originally introduced commercially in 1885. This variety is a butter head type of lettuce that produces 8 to 12 inch heads. The leaves are a creamy yellow to light green color and are tipped with a beautiful reddish-bronze color on the outer leaves. For beauty, Marvel of the Four Seasons is one of the most striking and gorgeous lettuces available. It features an excellent flavor, grows well in all types of climates and can be sown in both spring and autumn providing an extended growing season and more fresh produce for your family

Prizehead Leaf Lettuce

  • Prizehead-Vegetable Seeds (1)45 days
  •  Package contains approximately 2,000 Prizehead Lettuce Seeds.
  •  Heirloom
  •  Germination: 8-14 days at 35-75F.
  •  Plant 1/4-1/2″ deep, 1″ apart, with 14-18″ between rows.
Prizehead Lettuce produces green, crumpled leaves with a reddish-pink tinge at the tip. This attractive lettuce looks great in a salad or used as a garnish. Although called “Prizehead,” this is a leaf lettuce and doesn’t form a head.
Lettuce is one of the best and most versatile things you can grow in your garden. It is a cool-season veggie that grows fairly quickly and offers some of the first tastes of your garden’s bounty during the growing season. You can create wonderful gourmet salads that include lettuces of various sizes, shapes, colors, textures, and tastes.

Green Romaine Parris Island Lettuce

parris-island-cos-lettuceA beautiful romaine-type lettuce with uniform heads that are pale cream-green inside and dark green outside. An easy grower and the ideal “cut-and-come-again” variety, producing mild, crisp, sweet & tasty greens. Makes amazing Caesar salads.

Developed around 1949 and named after Parris Island, which is off the coast of South Carolina and is not particularly suited to lettuce cultivation, this variety puts up with the strains of heat and drought and not-so-perfect soils. Its upright romaine habit keeps it going well into the summer without bolting. Also has good resistance to tipburn and tolerance to mosaic virus. 70 days.

Oak Leaf Lettuce

  • oakleaf-lettuce (1)40 days to harvest
  • Heirloom variety
  • Prefers pH of 6.2-6.8.

Very old variety, dates back from the late 1700’s. Forms a tight rosette of medium green, deeply lobed leaves. Pick the outer leaves and the plant will keep producing more all season. Tender, long-standing and heat-resistant.  Sweet, non-bitter leaves.  Oakleaf lettuce can produce into late summer.

Salad Bowl Green Lettuce

  • SaladBowlOpen pollinated. Organic. 45 days. Heirloom.
  • Salad Bowl Lettuce is a large,
  • Midseason
  • Loose-leaved
  • Slow to bolt
  • Irregular leaves resemble endive.
  • Heat resistant.
Sow seed ¼” deep in well prepared soil that has been amended with a general garden fertilizer or rich compost when soil temperatures are between 40°-80˚.  Sow indoors 4 weeks before transplanting outdoors. Plant in early spring and again in fall. When young plants are well established begin thinning. The plants should stand 6” apart. Plant every few  weeks as long as weather is cool for a continuous supply. Grow  lettuce  quickly  for a crisp leaf. Keep the soil moderately moist during the entire growing season.

 

BIBB Head Lettuce

Bibb-Lettuce-MainBoston lettuce is also known as Bibb, Butter, Buttercrunch and Tom Thumb lettuce.    This is a delicate lettuce with velvety and a butter like texture of leaves. The outer leaves are large and broad and the ones toward the center are smaller with a more butter like texture. This lettuce forms compact rosette shaped heads.  The outer leaves are broad and wavy.  The inner leaves have a yellow tint and are more tightly bound.

There are two popular varieties of this type of lettuce which are the Boston and Bibb types. The Bibb lettuce has leaves which are a little darker and narrower than Boston lettuce. These lettuces can be found in clamshell plastic containers with the roots attached or may be loose without their roots.

Now, many growers of Boston lettuce have moved to hydroponics to grow it.  Hydroponics does not use soil, but uses water infused with nutrients.  This system is contained in specially designed greenhouses.  These greenhouses are climate controlled and can grow 16 crops per year.  Many of these butter lettuces grown in this method are packaged with the roots attached in clamshell plastic packaging.

Green Ice Lettuce

  • green iceHeight: 12 inches.
  • Spacing: 12 – 18 inches between plants, 18 – 30 inches between rows.
  • Depth: At soil surface. (needs light to germinate).Do not cover seed with soil.
  • Spread: 12 inches.
  • Sun/Shade: Full Sun.
  • Yield: 100 heads/100 foot row.
  • Foliage: Green ruffled foliage.
  • Days To Maturity: 45 days.

Green Ice is one of the crispest, most satisfying loose-leaf lettuces you can grow. The leaves are glossy, dark green, and savoyed, giving them extra-crunchy texture in every bite. Ready in just 45 days, they are among the earliest, yet last well into summer, thanks to superior heat tolerance. This is one loose-leaf that just won’t bolt! A distinctly different look and appeal, combining the large, ruffled look of a looseleaf with the crunchiness of a crisphead. Gardeners have enjoyed its bounty for years!

Lettuce thrives in cold weather and can be sown directly into the garden, starting in early spring. For an even earlier harvest, sow indoors; the seedlings don’t mind transplanting. If a fall crop is desired, begin in late summer. Grow in single rows, plants spaced 18 inches apart, or in containers.

Green Curled Ruffec Endive

  • EndiveGreenCurledRuffecoType: Heirloom
  • Size at Maturity: 15″ Heads
  • Days to Maturity: 90 Days
  • Light Requirement: Sun/Partial Shade
  • Planting Time: Cool Season
  • Sowing Method: Direct or Indoor Sow
  • Planting Depth: 1/8″
  • Plant Spacing: 15″ – 18″ apart

The lacy-edged leaves of curly endive and the broad leaves of its close relative escarole, are known for their slightly bitter, buttery taste. Grow both Broadleaf Batavian and Green Curled Ruffec in the same manner as you would your lettuce seeds as they have the same basic requirements. One bonus: Endive is more tolerant of hot weather.

Though Endive seeds will grow in both Spring and Fall, a Fall planting is ideal as frost improves the plants’ flavor and decreases its bitterness. Endive seeds are good candidates for container gardens. Try growing your Endive in a container on your patio or deck – close enough to the kitchen to add to your dinner salad!

Broadleaf Batavian Endive

  • Broadleaf-Batavian-Endive-SeedsZones: 3-9
  • Planting Depth: 1/4″ inch
  • Spacing: 10″ inches between plants, 18″ inches between rows
  • Sun/Shade: Partial Sun
  • Germination: 5-12 days
  • Days to Maturity: 80 days
  • Height: 10-12″ inches
  • Fruit: Medium Green
  • Comments: Great for garnishes.

Broadleaf Batavian Endive, or Escarole, resembles a lettuce head, an old variety dating back to the 1860s. The wide, curling leaves form around a 10-12″ tightly packed head with a well blanched, creamy heart. The heart will blanch to a creamy white while allowing an on-going harvest of the outer leaves. For the most tender and flavorful leaves, plant either early or late in the season to avoid the hot season.

A market grower favorite, the leaves are lettuce-like, large, broad, and reach 12 – 16 inches tall. Broad leaf endive varieties, or escarole, are usually less bitter than the curly leaf varieties. Use like other greens; fresh in a green salad, sautéed, or chopped and added into soups and stews.

Bunte Forellenschluss Lettuce

  • bunteHeads grow to loose 8-10 inches
  • Apple-green leaves splashed with maroon
  • Butterhead lettuce

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.

It may be that the ancient Egyptians were the first to cultivate lettuce from a weed, valuable for its oil producing seeds, to a food crop grown for its leaves. The Greeks and Romans adopted the vegetable and it spread to Europe. By the 18th century many varieties of lettuce had been developed that still exist today.

This can be used in salads or as an addition to sandwiches and burgers. Mix it with other varieties to create a salad mix of different textures, colors, and flavors.

Salads that have a lettuce base are often combined with grated cheese, fresh or dried fruit, nuts, and rich and crispy meats like bacon or pork belly.

Mantilia Lettuce

  • mantilia-lettuce-organicOrganic
  • Slow to bolt
  • Soft texture and mild flavor
  • Butterhead lettuce

This variety will grow well in most regions of the United States.

This butterhead lettuce was introduced to the seed trade by Renee Shepherd. It was first offered in the 2005 Seed Savers Exchange Yearbook by Margaret Lauterbach of Boise, Idaho.

This lettuce can be used in salads or as an addition to sandwiches and burgers. Mix it with other varieties to create a salad mix of different textures, colors, and flavors.

Salads that have a lettuce base are often combined with grated cheese, fresh or dried fruit, nuts, and rich and crispy meats like bacon or pork belly.

This variety is also great for lettuce wraps. The crisp, sweet flavor of the lettuce compliments spicy fillings nicely.

It may be that the ancient Egyptians were the first to cultivate lettuce from a weed, valuable for its oil producing seeds, to a food crop grown for its leaves. The Greeks and Romans adopted the vegetable and it spread to Europe. By the 18th century many varieties of lettuce had been developed that still exist today.

Green Deer Tongue

Deer-Tongue2Amish Deer Tongue Lettuce dates to the 1840s, has medium green triangular leaves that form a loose upright head. Pleasantly sharp flavor, slow to bolt, dependable and a high producer. Valued by the Amish for its ruggedness and high production. Very popular with heirloom growers, market gardeners and chef’s growers.

This heat tolerant variety is less prone to bolting in warmer weather and is tolerant to different climates. This incredible lettuce is in danger of extinction and is listed on Slow Food USA Ark of Taste. The Ark is an international catalog of foods that are threatened by industrial standardization, the regulations of large-scale distribution and environmental damage.

45 – 55 days  This excellent 19th Century American heirloom is tolerant across a range of climates, being very resistant to bolting in summer. The almost triangular, loose, jade green leaves have a sharp but pleasant taste and good texture.

Miner’s Lettuce

miners-lettuceMiners green tends to grow prolifically in late winter to mid spring between cool springtime temp’s of 60-80 degrees, particularly in partly shaded regions in woodland areas.

Being an annual herb that reseeds itself every year, it can grow in large numbers with prolific patches that can take up entire hillsides when the weather conditions are optimal.

Once you spot miners green growing wild on an untamed forested slope, you know you can come back and visit year after year to enjoy bags of the lettuce free for the taking.

French Crisp\Batavia Lettuce

french crisp lettuce_cardinale_22Summer Crisp (aka Batavian) lettuces are the absolute finest group of lettuces to grow. They can be produced under cool conditions (like other lettuces), yet still will be standing, long after other heat resistant lettuces have bolted.

Pick leaves at baby size, or allow plants to head. Summer Crisp lettuce can be harvested by removing a few of the outer leaves of the head; the plants will continue to grow and produce. Or alternatively, harvest entire large, gorgeous head at once.Leaves are thick, juicy, and flavorful. Summer Crisp lettuces are extraordinarily heat tolerant.

Midnight Ruffles

  • Midnight-Ruffles-LT161-DSC07697Germ 4-10 days
    This new variety from an Oregon breeder is the darkest red lettuce we have seen, almost black in color. The leafy plant is full in the center with serrated leaf edges, blistered leaves, and red midrib and veins. 500 seeds
  • PLANTING:
  • Indoors- 3-4 weeks before planting outside. Sow 1/4” deep in cells with soil temps 55-70 degrees. Transplant out 8-12” apart.
  • Outdoors- Sow 1/4” “deep, 1” apart. Thin to 6-12”, depending on the size of lettuce you want from baby to full heads. Keep moist during germination.
  • Harvest- cut whole head at base or individual leaves before lettuce starts to bolts and becomes bitter in the heat and long days summer.
  • Tips- Plant into fertile soil with lots of organic matter and adequate water for optimum growth. Sow heavy seeded rows every 10-14 days for baby greens using the 1 oz. Pinetree Lettuce Mix for a season long supply of lettuce.

Crisp Mint Romaine

  • crisp mint45-55 days
  • Ht. 10 inches
  • Compact heads
  • Can be grown as baby leaf
  • Keeps in good condition over a long period
  • Popular heirloom Name must come from the color as there is no minty flavor
  • To extend harvest re-sow every 10 days in soil cooler than 75 degrees F.

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Red Aztec Spinach – Huauzontle

  • red aztec SpinachOpen pollinated. 80 days. Heirloom.
  • Bright red leaves on four foot plants, with flower heads similar to lamb’s quarters.
  • Huauzontle is an Aztec plant with a flavor like broccoli, the tender tips and leaves are used for salads, cooked in butter with onion and garlic like spinach. Fine Mexico City restaurants use young tender seed heads dipped in batter and sauteed.
  • This was apparently an important crop for the Aztecs and the people who lived in Mexico before them.
  • Our colorful selection is very desirable as an ornamental edible.

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Oaky Red Splash

  • Oaky Red Splash48 days.
  • A one-of-a-kind oak leaf lettuce sure to make a splash at your dinner table!
  • Leaves are green tinged in copper, and sprinkled with a bit of red.
  • Grows somewhat upright to 8 inches and forms a heart with thick, juicy midribs brushed with pink.
  • Excellent for harvest from early spring through fall.
  • The deeply lobed leaves aren’t frilled on the margin, giving it a fresh appearance hours after harvest.

Salad Leaves Corn Salad Vit

  • corn saladSeason: Annual
  • USDA Zones: 5 – 10
  • Height: 12 inches
  • Bloom Season: Early spring to early fall
  • Bloom Color: White
  • Environment: Full sun to partial shade
  • Soil Type: Fairly rich, light, loamy soil
  • Temperature: 55 – 65F
  • Average Germ Time: 7 – 14 day
  • Depth: 1/4 – 1/2 inch
  • Sowing Rate: 35 to 50 seeds per foot in rows 12 inches apart
  • Moisture: Keep seeds moist until germination
  • Plant Spacing: 3 – 6 inches in rows 12 inches apart

Corn Salad seeds were often found growing in the wild and found in the grain fields of Europe. Once considered to be rather weedy, it now has improved cultivars and is grown throughout Europe and North America for an early spring nutritious herb. Corn Salad, also called Mache, grows from a basal rosette of rounded, spoon-shaped leaves. The succulent leaves that can be 6 inches long have a nutty, sweet flavor that is excellent in tossed green salads. The Mache herb is a nutritious addition to grow in the herb garden with leaves that provide vitamins and minerals, especially iron.

For more information contact:

Sustainable Living Products

541-996-3671
6349 S Hwy 101
Lincoln City, OR
info@tsunameseeds.com

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This entry was posted on May 24, 2016 by .